Resources

We have created a number of templates for you to adapt to suit your group, and samples of materials used by other groups to get their issue on the agenda.

Letter to the editor

Submitted on 3 Feb 2009

These should always be written and sent as soon as possible after the news story or event that prompted your interest took place. Leave it 48 hours, and you'll have missed the boat!

Minutes

Submitted on 3 Feb 2009

Keeping minutes of your meeting it is important for record keeping and so you can chart the progress of your group. You can also circulate them to people who are interested, but couldn’t be at the meeting.

Action lists

Submitted on 3 Feb 2009

You can use a meeting action list instead of formal meetings - that way, you only record what people agreed to do, rather than everything that was discussed

Agenda - general meetings

Submitted on 3 Feb 2009

Setting an agenda for your meeting helps you keep focused, and helps people know what will be covered and how long the meeting will be.

Poster or flyer

Submitted on 3 Feb 2009

Here’s an example of some material from the Canadian WalkON program designed to encourage people to get together and talk about making their community more walkable, which could be used as a poster or a flyer. A poster or flyer can be used to raise awareness of walking in your local neighbourhood. You can put posters anywhere (legal) that you think people will see them: front fences, shop windows, and local noticeboards, just for a start. If you’re doing a flyer, you can drop them in letterboxes, put them under windshield wipers or hand them out wherever people gather. For more ideas about how to use posters and flyers, see the sections on finding people and promoting your group.

Agenda - first meeting

Submitted on 3 Feb 2009

Getting the agenda for your first meeting right can help set the tone for the future of your group.

Media Release

Submitted on 3 Feb 2009

When writing your media release, use the format of a news story to write up your issue, keep it accurate, clear and brief, and make sure you convey the key elements – Who? What? When? Where? Why? and How. Use a catchy, concise headline for interest. Good media releases start with the most important issues and follow with other details in descending importance. Keep paragraphs to two sentences or less and use simple words and phrases. Have a spokesperson for your group who is available to talk with the media and include a punchy quote from them.

Letter to supporters

Submitted on 3 Feb 2009

Supporters are people or groups who won’t necessarily join your group, but may lend or give you resources, skills, public statements of support or even funding that can help your group achieve more than it could on its own. Here's a sample letter to supporters, that you can adapt or use as a base for your own communications.

Mission statements

Submitted on 3 Feb 2009

A mission says who your group is, and what it exists to do. Here are how similar organisations from around the world are describing their mission.

Vision statements

Submitted on 3 Feb 2009

A vision says what you want your neighbourhood and community to look like when you’ve achieved everything you’ve set out to do. Here are how similar organisations from around the world are describing their vision.

North East Integrated Transport Study - Data Analysis Report - July 2006

Submitted on 19 May 2009

This is a page lifted from the North East Integrated Transport Study of July 2006. The table highlights the vehicle traffic volume data for Burke Road which feeds the BRN Roundabout. The table demonstrates how Burke Road North is a key main road within the City of Banyule for commercial vehicle movements and the greater northern region of Melbourne yet there is no safe provision for pedestrians to cross BRN at the roundabout precinct.

New South Wales Court of Appeal

Submitted on 19 May 2009

Case Study - New South Wales Court of Appeal. This case study highlights issues associated with road design and line of sight. There are several notable outcomes in the judicial findings of this case study. Sections -39, 44, & 46 are instructive in their critique of lines of sight and road design.

North East Integrated Transport Study - Data Analysis Report - Traffic Volumes - July 2006

Submitted on 19 May 2009

This is a page lifted from the North East Integrated Transport Study of July 2006. The table highlights the vehicle traffic volume data for Burke Road which feeds the BRN Roundabout. The table demonstrates how Burke Road North is a key main road within the City of Banyule and the greater northern region of Melbourne yet there is no safe provision for pedestrians to cross BRN at the roundabout precinct.